Author: Kirstie Pickles

Dr Kirstie Pickles BVMS MSc PgCert(CounsSkills) PhD CertEM(IntMed) DipECEIM MRCVS RCVS RCVS and European Specialist in Equine Internal Medicine Kirstie is a European Specialist in equine medicine and has spent over 20 years working in private equine practice and academia in the UK, USA and New Zealand. She is currently a Clinical Associate Professor in Equine Medicine at Nottingham Veterinary School and is passionate about education at all levels, whether that is horse owners, vet students or practising veterinary surgeons.

Equine First Aid by Dr. Kirstie Pickles. An Overview: 1. Wounds 2. Haemorrhage 3. Non-weight bearing lameness 4. Colic 5. First Aid Kit 6. Q&A Please be warned – Due to the nature of the topic please be warned that anyone who is worried or upset by graphic images or has very young children present that there are images of wounds, blood, and graphic scenes to animals in this webinar. This webinar was first presented on 7th January 2021. WATCH THE VIDEO BELOW

Read More

Worm control in foals and yearlings Worming your young horse is very important to avoid a worm burden. In this article, Dr Kirstie Pickles discusses worming foals from two months old to yearlings in more detail to support owners of young horses with the first year of worming.  If you have any questions about worming please drop us a line in the private Facebook Group. Overview Young foals less than two months of age are primarily exposed to Strongyloides westeri (threadworm) and Parascaris worms (roundworm). The main worm of concern in foals between two months and weaning is Parascaris. Following…

Read More

Avoiding spring laminitis Ninety per cent of laminitis is caused by the underlying metabolic conditions equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) and Cushing’s disease (pars pituitary intermedia dysfunction, PPID). If your pony/horse is at risk of these diseases, you must start thinking about laminitis as soon as spring grass growth occurs. All native breeds and many cob types have some degree of insulin resistance which predisposes them to EMS. PPID is common in older horses with 20% of horses over 16 years of age having a positive blood test for this disease. Testing older horses for PPID and susceptible (overweight and/or cresty…

Read More

Dr Kirstie Pickles BVMS MSc PhD CertEM(IntMeed) DipECEIM MRCVS Chine House Veterinary Hospital Read this article by Dr Kirstie Pickles to find out what is anaemia in horses, the symptoms, cause and diagnosis, and what role does iron really play? What is anaemia? Anaemia is when the number of circulating red blood cells in the bloodstream is decreased below the given normal range. The normal ‘packed cell volume’ (PCV) in the horse is 32-52%. This is a measure of the percentage of fluid blood taken up by red blood cells. The range is so wide because red cell count is…

Read More

Mud Fever – What is it? Risk factors? Treatments? Prevention? What Is It? It has been a wet winter and all that rain has led to a lot of muddy fields. For horses that spend time turned out in these persistently wet, muddy conditions, it can be very difficult to avoid mud fever. Mud fever refers to inflammation of the skin (dermatitis) that causes irritation, soreness, matted areas of hair, and scabs on the horse’s lower legs, most commonly the back of the pastern and the heels. The skin becomes soft from permanently being wet and is then easily traumatised…

Read More

Preparing for Goodbye Although it will never be a welcome decision, we are in a privileged position as animal owners to elect euthanasia to say goodbye to our beloved animals. The word euthanasia is derived from Greek and means “good death”. It allows us to intentionally end a life to relieve pain and suffering. Owners may face this decision suddenly due to an untreatable or painful disease e.g. colic, or due to end-stage chronic disease that has become unmanageable such that quality of life is compromised. Planning ahead for this moment is very useful as it can be difficult to…

Read More

A pre-recorded webinar covering The Science behind Worming Your Horse by Dr Kirstie Pickles Traditionally people either didn’t worm their horses or if they did they tended to maintain the same worming routine, worming their horses a set chemical at set times of the year. In recent years targeted worming has become more popular with worm egg counts being taken from dung samples and then horses only being wormed for the worm burden they have. This system claims to help reduce the risk of chemical resistance in worms, to help you avoid giving your horse unnecessary chemicals if they don’t…

Read More

NOVEMBER UP-DATE FOR SYCAMORE TREE POSIONING CASES (ATYPICAL MYOPATHY) PREVIOUS DATA: The toxin responsible for atypical myopathy is contained in sycamore samaras (Acer pseudoplatanus (= maple tree; see pictures). With the winds of the previous weeks, the samaras have fallen in large quantities and constitute a high risk of intoxication. The number of cases of atypical myopathy is constantly increasing. Unfortunately, this autumn, the mortality rate seems to be particularly high. We therefore advise: – To prohibit access to pastures containing sycamore maple samaras (or even delimit the pasture to avoid areas where samaras are present in large numbers); – Or, at least, limit the…

Read More

At David Marlin we are always trying to point you in the direction of great resources and with that in mind we highly recommend that you tune into this FREE WEBINAR with Dr Sue Dyson who is the guest speaker for this week’s Welfare Wednesday webinar on HorseTalk.co.nz. Dr Sue Dyson will be talking about recognising pain in the ridden horse To find out more please, Click Here

Read More

Evidence-based Guidelines for Equine Wound Care Dr Kirstie Pickles BVMS MSc PhD CertEM(IntMed) DipECEIM MRCVS To address the lack of evidence-based guidelines for wound management in horses, the British Veterinary Association and the Equine Veterinary Journal appointed a panel of equine veterinary surgeons to produce such recommendations. The panel identified wound management questions relevant to clinical practice, appraised the current veterinary evidence for each question through a systematic search of databases and reviewed current recommendations from human evidence if there was insufficient veterinary evidence. Due to the limited number of high-quality evidence studies in horses, many of the final guidelines…

Read More