Author: Gillian Tabor

Dr Gillian Tabor with horse

Gillian Tabor MSc ResM MCSP HCPCreg Chartered Physiotherapist Cat A member ‘Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Animal Therapy’ Gillian has been working as an ACPAT Veterinary Physiotherapist for over 15 years. She specialises in physio for horses and riders, with a focus on treatment and rehabilitation of competition horses. Gillian is the programme manager and lectures on the MSc Veterinary Physiotherapy course at Hartpury University and is undertaking research, both her own equine projects and supervising students.

Dr Gillian Tabor shares some practical tips on carrot stretches* and how to get started with them. We have all heard that we should do carrot stretches* with our horses. The research shows us they are good for mobility of the spine, using the major muscles to create the movement, and there are also good effects on the deeper muscles that are responsible for stabilising the spine.  But are there any issues in using them with your horse? When is it sensible not to do them? Are there good and bad ways to do them? In this video, Dr Gillian…

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Gillian is a charted equine physiotherapist and this is review of the paper, Posture and Pull Pressure by Horses When Eating Hay or Haylage from a Hay Net Hung at Various Positions by Hodgson and colleagues. Dr Gillian Tabor is a charted physiotherapist specialising in the treatment and rehabilitation of horses. In this podcast, Gillian reviews a very recent research paper, Posture and Pull Pressure by Horses When Eating Hay or Haylage from a Hay Net Hung at Various Positions by Hodgson and colleagues. Through her research review, Gillian poses questions about how feeding from haynets differs from how wild horses…

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Research review – Posture and pull pressure by horses when eating hay or haylage from a haynet hung at various positions by Hodgson and colleagues Authors: Samantha Hodgson, Pam Bennett-Skinner, Bryony Lancaster, Sarah Upton, Patricia Harris and Andrea D. Ellis Affiliations: The University of Edinburgh Publication Date: 21-11-2022Access: Abstract availablePaper Link: Click here to download the paper This study caught my attention because I have looked at a range of previous research on the topic, which are reviewed in the introduction to this paper. They reference the studies that suggest methods to reduce the speed of eating hay. we know…

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In the UK, it’s that time of year again horses are getting woolly and hairy. Realistically, if we want to keep them working over the winter, we have to remove some of that fluff to maintain temperature regulation so they can be more comfortable when we are working them. For some of us clipping horses, although results in us being itchy, isn’t really too much of a challenge. We might even perceive that our horse enjoys being clipped if they stand still and stay relaxed during the process. However, I am acutely aware that it is not this easy for…

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If you have found your perfect new partner, you have had your vet do a pre-purchase examination, and they’re ready to arrive at your yard, there is a long list of factors that you need to consider during the period that your horse settles in. As a physio, I’m going to cover one aspect of their musculoskeletal health that will be relevant to horse changing yards and owners. Important considerations are the general health of the horse such as worming and changing the feed, as well as the different for forages either fed in the stable or when the horses…

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Dr Gillian Tabor takes us through the process of checking your horse’s head and poll. This may be necessary if your horse has had an accident or a suspected accident, knocking their head, falling over or being kicked etc. Gillian discusses which muscles, bones and areas to look at and feel, also what they should feel like. LOG IN TO WATCH THE FULL WEBINAR BELOW:

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The high-tech alternative to the flexicurve – New research , assessing equine back shape and symmetry using 3D scanning David and I are really pleased to share that we have had a research paper published this month.  We looked to see if we could use a new method of measuring the shape of horses’ backs and if it was a repeatable technique.  The tool used was a Skanect 3D scanner mounted on an iPad which was used to capture the trunk shape of 10 endurance horses.  This was then analysed using computer software to create measurements of each horse’s profile…

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Doing science is tough – it’s expensive and time-consuming. It’s no surprise that companies trying to sell the latest therapy gadget, lotion, potion or the most technical method of curing your horse’s pain with certain exercises, often are marketed without any science used to support them. Doing good science is challenging, and even the best science experiments are never perfect. So why should we always ask to see the research evidence when we read social media campaigns for miracle cures? Are our expectations too high? Does it really matter if the product actually does what people say it does? Yes…

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Gillian reviews recent research on kinematics and kinetics of lungeing. Including information on different rollers. Gillian discusses the questions: – • What is the purpose of lungeing?• What are the goals of lungeing? • Should you include lungeing as part of your horse’s training?• Are there any risks to your horse if you do too much lungeing?• If you choose to lunge, what equipment should you use? LOG IN TO WATCH THE FULL WEBINAR BELOW: LOG IN TO WATCH THE FULL WEBINAR BELOW:

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