Author: David Marlin

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Dr David Marlin is a physiologist and biochemist who has worked in academia, research and professional sport. He has worked in the equestrian and veterinary world and in human sport, healthcare, medicine and exercise science. In 1989 David obtained his PhD from the UK’s leading sports university, Loughborough University following a four-year study on the responses of Thoroughbred racehorses to exercise and training, undertaken at the renowned Animal Health Trust in Newmarket. You can read David's full biography in the Our Website section.

Perhaps surprisingly, we know very little about turning in horses. A better understanding of the demands of turning could inform course design, fitness, stress on the musculoskeletal system and appropriate use of studs. Dr Heather Cameron-Whytock, Dr Russell MacKechnie-Guire and myself have designed a study to investigate turning and we are looking for volunteers within around 1-2h of Myerscough College Equestrian Centre (PR3 0RY) to take part. WHEN: WEDNESDAY 25th and/or THURSDAY 26th October 2023 HOW LONG: 1-2h maximum – 1 day only unless you want come twice WHERE: Myerscough College Equestrian Centre, St Michaels Road, Bilsborrow, PR3 0RY WHAT:…

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Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris) What is sugar beet? Sugar beet is a traditional and popular feed ingredient for horses and is a byproduct of the extraction of sugar from the root of the plant or the “beet”. The pulp that is left over when the sugar has been extracted forms the basis for the “sugar beet” products fed to horses and ponies and many farm animals. However, not all sugar beet products are produced in the same way, and how they are produced can have a significant effect on quality. The pulp remaining after the sugar has been extracted is…

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Do you feed sugar beet to your horses? If yes, why? If not why?We want to hear what you think! Sugar beet is a relatively common feed given to horses and ponies. In this short survey, we are interested in understanding how commonly it is fed, how it is fed and why owners choose to feed it.By SUGAR BEET BASED PRODUCTS, we mean products where the ONLY or MAIN or SECONDARY ingredient is SUGAR BEET AND the products need SOAKING before feeding. If you use MORE THAN ONE SUGAR BEET product please feel free to fill in the survey a second…

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Every week Dr David Marlin looks at a different common equine supplement ingredient and explains what it is, what it is made from, what effects people hope it will have, and any benefits or drawbacks to using it as a feedstuff for horses. There are literally hundreds of different ingredients used in equine supplements. Here is a shortexplanation about the most common ones and evidence for efficacy, if any exists. Potassium and Chloride are essential electrolytes that are lost in sweat. Electrolytes are vital to for the normal function of the body. Electrolyte deficiencies can affect every body system from…

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Volunteers wanted for an iPhone or Andriod distance, speed, location and gait. Some members may already know that I have tested out the Enduro Equine Heart Rate Monitor and App. Enduro Equine have now introduced some new features, including gait detection and is looking for volunteers to test out the app. All you need is an iPhone or an Android phone. Email hello@drdavidmarlin.co.uk with ENDURO in the subject and tell us what phone you have. ENDURO will then send you a link to download a version of the new app that isn’t in the market yet. You will be the…

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Do you understand what tapering is and how to use it effectively? Have you heard the term tapering in reference to equestrian competition/racing? We recently held a short survey to determine what horse riders know and understand about tapering. Watch the video below to learn the results. https://vimeo.com/862019303/3182c02cd5?share=copy Click on the links below to learn more about tapering and how you can use it to benefit your horse and strive for competition success! Podcast – Tapering for Performance – Dr David Marlin Article – Tapering training for improved equestrian performance Live Talk – Preparing for competition – BD SE Keysoe…

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Every week Dr David Marlin looks at a different common equine supplement ingredient and explains what it is, what it is made from, what effects people hope it will have, and any benefits or drawbacks to using it as a feedstuff for horses. There are literally hundreds of different ingredients used in equine supplements. Here is a shortexplanation about the most common ones and evidence for efficacy, if any exists. Piperine Black pepper is used in Ayurveda for its ability to increase the bioavailability of other nutrients, specifically Curcumin1. Piperine is the specific ingredient in black pepper that has this…

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Latest Headshaking Research Presented at British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) Congress 2023 in Birmingham, UK Last week Dr Veronica Roberts presented our group’s latest research on horses with TRIGEMINAL-MEDIATED HEADSHAKING at the 2023 BEVA CONGRESS in Birmingham. Headshaking is a distressing condition for both affected horses or ponies and their owners. It’s often discussed as being similar to neuralgia in people. Neuralgia is pain from nerves, and human patients often describe it as being similar to “burning”, “electric shock” or “pins and needles”. In horses, the pain causes violent, usually vertical (up and down) movements of the head, as shown…

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A large debate is taking place on social media and elsewhere as to whether closed-front XC boots are leading to an increased risk of rotational falls. The first thing to state on this topic is that at this stage this is JUST A THEORY! I have not seen any evidence to suggest this is the case. And having talked to someone involved in the UK XC falls research, they don’t subscribe to this theory either. The THEORY, as I understand it is that the closed boot increases the friction between the leg (front of the boot) and the jump surface,…

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Have you ever looked through the mesh of a fly mask and wondered what your horse can see? If not, you might be surprised. The effect of mesh size Firstly, let’s look at the impact of the mesh size. Clearly the larger the mesh, the less your horse’s vision will be impaired and it will let more light in. Of course, a small mesh will keep out smaller flies and a larger mesh will only keep out the larger flies and let small ones like midges get in. So mesh size is important as the primary reason for using a…

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